Secure Certificate of Indian Status (SCIS) Photo App FAQs

FAQs regarding the Secure Certificate of Indian Status (SCIS) Photo App –

For distribution to all Regional Offices and IRAs

Updated July 2019

QuestionAnswer
1. What is the SCIS Photo App?

 

The SCIS Photo App is a digital application created by the Government of Canada that allows applicants to take a photo with a smartphone and submit it online as part of their Secure Certificate of Indian Status (SCIS) application. Available to download for free on both Apple and Android smartphones, the SCIS Photo App eliminates the cost of photos and offers a convenient way to provide the photo required to apply for the secure status card for the first time or for a renewal or a replacement.

 

2. What is the benefit of using the App?You no longer have to pay or travel to have passport-style photos taken for your Secure Certificate of Indian Status application. The App is an accessible, cost-free and secure way to take and submit your photo and guarantor’s name, email address and signature as part of the application process for a secure status card.

 

3. How does the App work?The SCIS Photo App can be downloaded for free on your smartphone from the Apple App Store or Google Play Store.

 

The App is easy to use and provides step-by-step instructions to take and submit your photo and provide your guarantor’s name, email address and signature. This information will be securely transmitted to Indigenous Services Canada (ISC) through the App and stored in a protected database. Once the information is submitted, the data will no longer exist on the smartphone.

 

To complete your application for the Secure Certificate of Indian Status (SCIS), you must submit a complete application (Form 83-169E), a Guarantor Declaration (Form 83-170E) and supporting documentation. To find out how to apply, visit canada.ca/indian-status.

 

The information you submitted through the App will be automatically linked with your complete application and supporting documentation. You do not need to contact Indigenous Services Canada (ISC) to inform us that you submitted your photo through the App.

 

4. How can I get the App?You can download the SCIS Photo App for free on your smartphone by simply searching “SCIS Photo App” in the Apple App Store or Google Play Store.

 

 

5. When did the App become available?

 

The App was publicly launched in the Apple App Store and Google Play Store in July 2019.

 

Prior to the launch, the SCIS Photo App was piloted across Indigenous Services Canada (ISC) Regional Offices from November 2018 to June 2019.

 

6. Does it cost money to use the App?No, the SCIS Photo App is free to download and it is free to submit your photos using the App. You will need a smartphone and internet access.

 

To complete your application for the Secure Certificate of Indian Status (SCIS), you must submit a complete application (Form 83-169E), a Guarantor Declaration (Form 83-170E) and supporting documentation. The Government of Canada does not charge applicants any fees to apply for a secure status card; however, there may be a cost associated with providing supporting documentation as part of their application. To learn more, visit canada.ca/indian-status.

 

7. I’ve already paid for “passport- style” photos for my application. Can I be reimbursed?No, Indigenous Services Canada (ISC) does not provide reimbursement for the cost of obtaining “passport-style” photos or supporting documentation as part of an application for the secure status card.

 

We understand the process of getting your photos may have been difficult. The SCIS Photo App has been designed to allow applicants to take their own photo, eliminating the cost of a photographer and making the application process more accessible and convenient.

 

8. What do I need to use the App?

 

Before you submit your photo through the SCIS Photo App, ensure you have the following:

 

·         Smartphone (Apple or Android mobile device) to download the App

·         Access to the internet or a public/private Wi-Fi network

·         Registration number

·         Valid email address

·         Guarantor present with a valid email address

To complete your application for the Secure Certificate of Indian Status (SCIS), you must submit a complete application (Form 83-169E), a Guarantor Declaration (Form 83-170E) and supporting documentation. To find out how to apply, visit canada.ca/indian-status.

9. What type of smartphone do I need to use the App?The App is compatible with the following operating systems:

 

·         Apple smartphones with iOS 11 or higher

·         Android smartphones with Nougat 7.0 or higher

 

10. Can I still use the App if I don’t have a smartphone?No, you need a smartphone to use the SCIS Photo App.

 

If you do not have a smart phone, you can use the SCIS Photo App on a family member or friend’s smartphone. Once the information is submitted, the data will no longer exist on the smartphone.

 

11. Can I still use the App if I don’t have internet access?No, you need internet access to use the SCIS Photo App.

 

If you do not have your own internet access, you may use the SCIS Photo App by connecting to any public or private Wi-Fi network.

 

You can also use the App on a family member or friend’s smartphone with internet access. Once the information is submitted, the data will no longer exist on the smartphone.

 

12. Do I still need to send an application?Yes. To complete your application for the Secure Certificate of Indian Status (SCIS), you must submit a complete application (Form 83-169E), a Guarantor Declaration (Form 83-170E) and supporting documentation. Once received, the information submitted through the Photo App will be automatically linked with your complete application and supporting documentation. To find out how to apply, visit canada.ca/indian-status.

 

13. Can I use the App to apply for registration/Indian status?

 

No. You must already be registered as a Status Indian under the Indian Act to use the SCIS Photo App. If you are not registered, you must provide a complete application (Form 83-168E) and supporting documentation. To find out how to apply, visit canada.ca/indian-status.

 

Unfortunately, you cannot use the SCIS Photo App to submit photos for an application for registration and a secure status card at the same time. However, once you are registered for Indian status, you will be able to use the SCIS Photo App to apply for your first secure status card separately or to renew or replace your secure status card.

 

If you have any questions regarding registration for Indian status or status cards, please visit canada.ca/indian-status or contact the Public Enquiries Contact Centre:

 

Public Enquiries Contact Centre

Indigenous Services Canada

10, rue Wellington

Gatineau QC  K1A 0H4

 

Email: aadnc.infopubs.aandc@canada.ca

Phone (toll-free): 1-800-567-9604

Fax: 1-866-817-3977

TTY (toll-free): 1-866-553-0554

 

14. Can I use the App to apply for a Certificate of Indian Status (CIS)?No, the SCIS Photo App cannot be used to submit photos to apply for the Certificate of Indian Status (CIS). The App is only compatible with the system used to issue the Secure Certificate of Indian Status (SCIS).

 

Some band offices continue to issue the Certificate of Indian Status (CIS). Contact your First Nation or band office for more information about this version of the status card.

 

The Secure Certificate of Indian Status (SCIS) is a more secure form of identification to confirm Indian status. To find out how to apply for the secure status card, visit canada.ca/indian-status.

 

15. Can I use the App to apply on behalf of my child/dependent adult?Yes, the SCIS Photo App can be used to submit photos to apply for the Secure Certificate of Indian Status (SCIS) on behalf of a child/dependent adult. To complete an application for the Secure Certificate of Indian Status (SCIS) on behalf of a child or dependent adult, you must submit a complete application (Form 83-169E), a Guarantor Declaration (Form 83-170E) and supporting documentation.

 

A parent or legal guardian must have the authority to act for the child or dependent adult in legal or financial matters to apply on their behalf. The most recent legal documents (divorce order, separation agreement, custody or guardianship order) proving custody or guardianship of the child to the applying parent or guardian must be provided with the application form and supporting documentation, if applicable.

 

16. Do I need a guarantor to use the App?Yes. You must find a person who can act as your guarantor and they must be present while you’re using the SCIS Photo App.

 

The guarantor will be prompted to provide their name, email address and digital signature. The same guarantor must also complete a Guarantor Declaration (Form 83-170E). The Guarantor Declaration (Form 83-170E) should be sent with the completed application (Form 83-169E) and supporting documentation.

 

For more information on who can be a guarantor, visit “About guarantors” under “Most requested” at canada.ca/indian-status.

 

Note: If submitting your application in-person and having your photo taken at a regional office, you may not need a guarantor. If submitting your application in-person at a band office and using the SCIS Photo App, an Indian Registration Administrator (IRA) can act as your guarantor if they have known you personally for 2 years.

 

17. Does Indigenous Services Canada (ISC) share my photos or personal information submitted through the App?

 

No, all information provided through the SCIS Photo App is secure and protected under the Privacy Act. The information is encrypted while being sent to Indigenous Services Canada (ISC) and stored in a secure database exclusively for SCIS applications. Once the information is submitted, the data will no longer exist on the smartphone.

 

The information you provide through the App is used to process your application for a secure status card. The collection and use of personal information submitted through the App is in accordance with the Privacy Act.

 

18. I used the App and I’m being asked to resubmit my photos. Can you help me?We apologize for the inconvenience and we appreciate your patience as we work to improve the SCIS Photo App.

 

To resubmit your photo, open the App and follow the step-by-step instructions. Only the last photo submitted will be used to process your secure status card application.

 

Acceptable photos must be:

 

·         Clear, sharp and in focus

·         Taken with a neutral facial expression (eyes open and clearly visible, mouth closed)

·         Taken straight on with face and shoulders centered and squared to the camera

·         Taken in front of a plain white or a lightly coloured background, with a clear difference between the face and background

 

To find out more about photo requirements, visit canada.ca/indian-status.

 

19. Can I resubmit my photo?Yes. To resubmit your photo, open the App and follow the step-by-step instructions. Only the last photo submitted will be used to process your secure status card application.

 

Once your application for secure status card has been processed, you cannot resubmit your photo until you apply for a renewal or a replacement.

 

20. What happens if I leave the App in the middle of submitting my photo and/or information (e.g. to take a call, answer a text, use another app)?If you leave the SCIS Photo App for any reason, the information is retained in the background of the App until your photo is submitted or the App is closed. The information that was retained in the background is protected and cannot be read by an outside party. Once the information is submitted, the data will no longer exist on the smartphone.

 

21. What happens if I made a mistake while using the App (e.g. entered the wrong registration number or information)?Please confirm your information and registration number before submitting your photo through the SCIS Photo App. If you entered any incorrect information, this may lead to delays in processing your secure status card application. If you think you entered incorrect information while using the App, please notify the Public Enquiries Contact Centre as soon as possible:

 

 

 

Public Enquiries Contact Centre

Indigenous Services Canada

10, rue Wellington

Gatineau QC  K1A 0H4

 

Email: aadnc.infopubs.aandc@canada.ca

Phone (toll-free): 1-800-567-9604

Fax: 1-866-817-3977

TTY (toll-free): 1-866-553-0554

 

22. I am having technical difficulties using the App. Who can I contact?If you are having technical difficulties using the SCIS Photo App, please email aadnc.supportphotocssi-scisphotosupport.aandc@canada.ca.

 

You can also contact the Public Enquiries Contact Centre:

 

Public Enquiries Contact Centre

Indigenous Services Canada

10, rue Wellington

Gatineau QC  K1A 0H4

 

Email: aadnc.infopubs.aandc@canada.ca

Phone (toll-free): 1-800-567-9604

Fax: 1-866-817-3977

TTY (toll-free): 1-866-553-0554

 

 

Listuguj Mi’gmaq Government Partners with 6th Annual RIG Race

The Listuguj Mi’gmaq Government is partnering with the 6th Annual RIG Race – a unique adventure and orientation race to be held from September 12 – 15, 2019.  In teams of two, athletes must race over 150 km or 300 km in 3 days, alternating several sports such as running, mountain biking, canoeing, swimming and rope challenges.

There will also be a 20km race specifically for the youth!

Athletes will race through Listuguj Mi’gmaq territory on the first day of the race on Friday, September 13, 2019.  They will make their way through various parts of our territory using only a compass and map.  The aim is to find check points located in areas that highlight our beautiful natural scenery such as the river, lakes and Gespe’gewa’gi trails.

We hope to cheer on a team from Listuguj!  If you’re interested in racing, the deadline to register is August 15, 2019.  Register now!

If you are interested in being a part of a volunteer committee or have any ideas to help make this a successful and fun event for everyone, you can contact Paige Isaac at paige.isaac@listuguj.ca or 418-788-2136. The Economic Development Unit will be the liaison between the RIG Race and Listuguj.

Click here for a video of the 2017 race to give you an idea of what it entails.

For even more information, visit their website.

Listuguj Mi’gmaq Government Gives Thanks to Those Who Donated to Migwite’tm ’81 Commemoration Community Event

 

Listuguj Mi’gmaq Government gives thanks to those who donated to Migwite’tm ’81 Commemoration Community Event

 

On June 11, 2019, the Listuguj Mi’gmaq Government held the Migwite’tm ’81 Commemoration community event, where community members took part in an organized walk while they reflected upon the significance of this day. The event ended with a feast in which the community enjoyed donated salmon and fiddleheads.

The Listuguj Mi’gmaq Government would like to give thanks to those who donated fiddleheads and salmon for this event. We would like to thank Ruby Barnaby, the Listuguj/McGill cohort, and Calvin Barnaby for donating their fiddleheads. As for the salmon, we would like to thank Gordon Isaac jr., Je’gopsn Metallic, Kyler Barnaby, Fred Metallic, and Tammy Martin. We would also like to thank Provigo for their work in processing the salmon.

We would like to acknowledge and thank you for your time and effort that went into the process of harvesting the salmon and fiddle heads, and then donating them for our community. Thanks to your donation, we were able to provide our community members a salmon and fiddlehead meal at our Migwite’tm ’81 Commemoration event and ensure that our community continues to remember the significance of this date while enjoying a nice plate of salmon and fiddleheads.

We hope that you will continue to provide donations for future events when they arise, and in doing so, will inspire others to help provide for our community as well. In this way, together, we can continue living our traditions and making paths for our younger generations to learn what it means to provide and be a part of our Mi’gmaq community.

 

Thank you!

Jill Martin, OCC Coordinator
jill.martin@listuguj.ca
(418)-788-2136 ext. 2026

Request for Proposals – Nursery Classrooms Addition

The Listuguj Mi’gmaq Government (“Owner”) requests Proposals from professional, qualified, experienced companies to design, engineer, procure, construct, deliver, erect, commission, start-up, and test the completed Project consisting of all necessary labor, materials, machinery, supplies, furnishings, facilities, tools, services, equipment, and necessary to build approximately 1,800 square feet Classroom extension to the existing Listuguj Education Complex Building that will be located at 1 Riverside East, Listuguj, Quebec, G0C 2R0. The Owner prefers Contractors to install prefabricated modular units. The units must be made operational by September 1, 2019, and commissioned on or before September 30, 2019.

 

Click here to download the Request for Proposals – Nursery Classrooms Addition

Click here to view the LMG Tender Policy

 

 

Listuguj Mi’gmaq Government to Review the Code of Conduct

Listuguj Mi’gmaq Government to Review the Code of Conduct

 

On Tuesday, May 21st, 2019, Chief and Council met at a Duly Convened Chief and Council meeting and discussed the recommended changes to the Code of Conduct.

 

During this meeting, it was determined that there will be no changes made to the Code of Conduct at this time. Instead, Council suggested and agreed to review the Code of Conduct in full detail through discussion and collaboration, to make sure that the document is in the best interest for Listuguj members. To do so, Council will take part in council training prior to the review of the document and to ensure that it is within Listuguj Mi’gmaq values and of best interest for the members of our community.

 

Furthermore, to stay consistent with the current requirements of the code, if there are any proposed changes brought forward by council, it will be first brought to community members of Listuguj through a general assembly before these changes can be implemented. The overall goal continues to be the development and implementation of strong laws, by-laws and operational codes that are in line with Listuguj Mi’gmaq values and that are supported and acknowledged by the community of Listuguj.

 

 

 

For more information:

 

Jill Martin, OCC Coordinator                                      Mike Isaac, Communication Manager

jill.martin@listuguj.ca                                                  misaac@listuguj.ca

(418)-788-2136 (2026)                                                 (418)-788-2136 (2168)

 

 

 

–30–

Lands & Membership Out of Office

We would like to inform the community that the Lands & Membership department will be out of the office for training the week of June 3rd, 2019.  Services will resume on Monday, June 10th, 2019.

To make an appointment with either Shoshana Isaac or Tina Barnaby, please call 418-788-2136.

Pam Palmater Talks about Nationhood at A.G.S.

Pam Palmater, renowned Mi’gmaq lawyer from Ugpi’ganjiq (Eel River Bar) and professor at Ryerson University, delivered a keynote address at Listuguj’s Alaqsite’w Gitpu School on March 22 as part of the school’s Siggw Cuture Day events and the LMG’s Honouring our Land mawiomi.

The address was delivered to the Grades 7 and 8 students, teaching staff, elected leaders of the Listuguj Mi’gmaq Government, Mi’gmaq Grand Council members, Elders and community members.

Palmater spoke about the importance of Mi’gmaq nationhood and sovereignty. She reminded the audience that Youth need to be involved and actively engaged in nation-building initiatives.

 You can check out Pam’s keynote address “Mi’kmaw Nationhood and Sovereignty in Listuguj” on Pam Palmater’s YouTube channel by following this link.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8xBOHHrPCPo

Nationhood in Action at the Honouring our Land Mawiomi

Grand Council members, elected leaders, Elders, academics, community members, and youth assembled at the Honouring our Land Mawiomi on March 21-23 in Listuguj. Over this three-day event, participants shared stories, songs, and engaged in active conversations about moose harvesting, nation building, and the transmission of Mi’gmaq knowledge to the youth.

The discussion responds to an ongoing concern raised by several communities about moose hunting on Mi’gmaq territory without properly requesting permission of local communities. In the fall of 2017, Chief Darcy Gray met with the Grand Chief of Kahnawake to express Listuguj’s concerns and to remind him that there is a traditional protocol of asking, and waiting for permission, when hunting on Mi’gmaq territory.

Chief Darcy Gray

The talks at the Honouring our Land Mawiomi culminated in the acceptance of a Proclamation that recognizes that Moose harvesting by Mi’gmaq should be in keeping with Mi’gmaq law including the concept and practice of Netugulimg. The Proclamation does not say ‘how many moose’ Listuguj community members, or others, can harvest. Rather, the Proclamation is intended to open the doorway and provide a foundation for Listuguj to adopt its own regulations for the responsible and respectful management of moose resources.

Pam Palmater, Mi’gmaq activist, author and lawyer, delivered a keynote talk at Alaqsite’w Gitpu School for Siggw Culture Day as part of this mawiomi. Palmater emphasized that nationhood is about taking action and is expressed in the ways we live. She added that it is critical that nationhood talks include Youth.

Pam Palmater speaking to Grand Council and Alaqsite'w Gitpu School students

Pam Palmater speaking to Grand Council and Alaqsite’w Gitpu School students

“You are the ones who need to be actively engaged in nation building right now on a daily basis. Our nations, especially the Mi’gmaq nation who has suffered five hundred years of colonization, we actually need you in nation building. We need you to be leaders right now, warriors right now, caregivers right now.”

At the gathering, Elders and youth raised concerns about safety, about respecting hunting areas, and about how to share the moose meat with community. Others raised concerns about over harvesting and emphasized the need to use all parts of the moose. There is a clear need and desire for communities to develop their own moose harvesting protocol.

“This event was a learning opportunity. It was about opening up that dialogue for people to share, to build, and to contribute. We are coming out of this event with guiding principles to develop our own moose harvesting plans. This is not our last gathering, it is the beginning and continuance of something bigger,” said Chief Gray.

Gji-Geptin Antle Denny

Gji-Geptin Antle Denny

Jaime Battiste (Treaty Education Lead at Mi’kmaw Kina’matnewey in Nova Scotia) delivered a powerful presentation about Mi’gmaq self-determination and Treaty Rights. He played the following video during his presentation: Click here to watch a video on Treaty Education in Nova Scotia.

“We have persevered through famine, disease, and genocide,” said Battiste. “Relationships are the most important thing and our rights [to our land] have been there all along.”

Gji-Geptin Antle Denny of the Grand Council echoed this assertion by emphasizing how governance is rooted in families, language, and connections with Mi’gmaq ancestral lands.

Corey Metallic, Jasmine Labillois, Luke Labillois and Danny Paul

Danny Paul, Luke LaBillois, Jasmine LaBillois, and Corey Metallic  (L to R)

Other highlights from the mawiomi include: three (3) facilitated discussions with approximately one-hundred participants. Paige Isaac and Denny Isaac facilitated A’tugwaqann (stories from Gespe’gewa’gi) where participants shared their stories from the land. Corey Metallic, Jasmine LaBillois, Luke LaBillois and Danny Paul delivered panel presentations on moose harvesting community programs. Tracey Metallic held an art workshop with a small group of mawiomi participants. The grades seven and eight students, and their teachers, from Alaqsite’w Gitpu School took part in a workshop on traditional approaches to moose management facilitated by Clifford Paul of the Unama’gi Institute of Natural Resources.

The event came to a close with a feast on Saturday evening. Grand Chief Arlen Dumas of the Assembly of the Manitoba Chiefs delivered a keynote reminding us that nation building is about acknowledging relations and staying connected with each other. Click on this link to hear Grand Chief Dumas singing the Mi’gmaq Honour Song.